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DPL Cricket Playing Rules

DPL Cricket Playing Rules

  • 1. SUMMARY AND SCOPE

  • The Delaware Premier League (DPL) was established in 2016 to provide cricket enthusiasts a platform to enjoy and promote the sport of cricket in the area.
  • The purpose of this document is to provide information for playing rules to be followed during the T20 cricket match. This includes guidance on rules and processes as well as removing ambiguities to ensure smooth conduct of matches. Every effort is made to make this document complete and comprehensive. This document will continue to be enhanced and updated to address changes, facilitate clarification of rules and regulations and in response to feedback from the teams.
  • For more clarity on specific situations that are not discussed within this document, please refer to the DPL Rulebook. It is mandatory for all team players to go through this document.
  • Questions or suggestions regarding DPL Cricket Playing Rules must be addressed to the DPL Committee for Rules and Regulations at SURFRS@DPLcric.com.
  1. PLAYING RULES

    1. BATTING RULES

      1. WEARING PROTECTIVE WEAR/GEAR

        1. All batsmen are encouraged to always wear protective abdominal guard during their batting.
        2. Batsmen can wear gloves while batting. However, the batsman can be also caught out if the ball touches the glove because the glove is considered the extension of the bat.
        3. The batsmen may also wear protective helmets to protect their heads.
        4. Batsmen can use protective wear worn under their clothing. Thigh guard, arm guards, chest guard/pad, shin guards, and elbow guards can be worn under batman’s clothing to protect the body of the batsman.
        5. Batting Pads Not Allowed: Batmen are not allowed to wear batting leg pads during their batting.
      2. PROVIDING BY-RUNNER

        1. DPL will allow a by-runner to be provided to the batsman under the circumstances where the batsman sustained an injured during the match.
          1. The umpire will be the sole and final judge of granting a by-runner.
          2. The captain of the fielding team can raise an objection to the umpire if it is felt that the by-runner is taking undue advantage by running before the ball is played by the batsman and can request removal of the by-runner. The decision to remove the by-runner is however at the sole discretion of the umpire.
          3. Teams cannot request for a by-runner for players with pre-existing conditions.
          4. A player who availed of a by-runner is not allowed to bowl or field after that point.
        2. If the umpires think that the player is taking unfair advantage (against the spirit of the game) by asking for a by-runner, they can report the player and the player’s team to the Discipline & Disputes committee (CDDA), who could then levy penalties for the player and team.
      3. BATSMEN RETIRING

        1. A batsman may retire at any time during their innings. The umpires, before allowing the play to proceed, shall be informed of the reason for a batsman retiring:
          1. The batsman will be judged ‘Retired Hurt” if the batsman retires due to injury, illness or other unavoidable causes during the match such as requiring a restroom break and there not being a restroom at the ground.
          2. If a batsman retires because of illness, injury or any other unavoidable causes, he is entitled to resume his innings after at least 5 overs and only re-enter at the fall of a wicket, unless he is the last batsman left to bat for the team. If for any reason, he cannot resume his innings, his innings is to be recorded as 'Retired – not out'.
          3. The batsman will be judged “Retired Out” if a batsman is replaced without any signs of injury. This is treated as a fall of a wicket. There is no concept of allowing a batsman retiring “Retired Not Out”.
      4. WASTING OF TIME

        1. Definition – Batsman consistently failing to take strike after the bowler is ready to start his run up or after he has started his run up. The umpire shall be the official timekeeper and is the sole judge in this matter. He shall inform the player and captain immediately after each violation.
      5. HANDLING THE BALL

        1. A batsman will be given out for handling the ball if, while playing a delivery, the batsman intentionally touches the ball with one or both of their hands. A decision of not out must be reached if the batsman handles the ball to avoid incurring an injury or while in the act of handing the ball back to the fielding side.
      6. HITTING THE BALL TWICE

        1. A batsman, while the ball is still in play, cannot hit it a second time with his bat except for the purpose of protecting his wicket. If a batsman does intentionally hit the ball twice, then the two umpires will consult with each other and the main umpire can then inform their decision, if an appeal was made by the fielding team-
          1. The double sound shot heard during a shot attempt, is not considered as hit the ball twice intentionally.
      7. LBW and LEG BYES

        1. There are NO LBWs OR LEG BYES in DPL.
        2. The umpire will NOT signal a leg bye nor will he give LBW decisions, at any time when the ball hit only the body of the batsman.
        3. To avoid controversies, if the ball hit the bat of the batsman after hitting any of the body parts of the batsman (during its normal course of travel – batsmen cannot stop the ball deliberately and then hit it) then that ball is considered dead ball as soon as the ball made contact with the batsman’s body.
        4. If the batsmen attempt to take the run after getting hit on the body first, only then umpire will signal NO runs scored and count it as a dot ball.
        5. The umpire will not entertain any run out appeals if the batsman at the striker or non-striker’s end falls short of the crease on a ball only hit the batsman’s body.
        6. A batsman is declared out bowled if the ball strikes his body and rolls onto the stumps and the bails fall as long as the no-ball rule is not violated.
      8. STUMPED OUT

        1. If the ball hits the batsman’s body and the ball deflected to the keeper while the batsman is STILL in the act of hitting the ball, AND the wicket keeper knocks off the bails with the batsman outside the crease, then the batsman should be given out.
      9. RUN-OUT

        1. In the event of both batsman running to the same end and a run-out has occurred by the time the batsmen have reached to the same end and the relevant umpire is uncertain over which batsman made his ground first, both umpires may consult before making a decision.
      10. HIT-WICKET

        1. The batsman, while the ball is in play, with his bat or by his body, body part or his protective gear, disrupts any part of the stumps and/or bails (batting side) while preparing to receive or in receiving a delivery or while immediately setting off for his first run, then the batsman can be declared out Hit-Wicket.
        2. Hit-Wicket is applicable only if the delivery bowled is a legal delivery, and not a wide ball or a No Ball.
        3. Hit-Wicket does not apply to the bowler end stumps and does not apply once the batsmen have started running between the wickets. It does not apply when a batsman is trying to avoid being a run-out or stumped out.
      11. TIMED-OUT

        1. The incoming batsman must be in position to take his guard or for his partner to be ready to receive the next ball within 3 minutes of a fall of previous wicket.
        2. Any incoming batsman in violation of above rule, can be declared out, timed out, upon appeal from fielding side.
        3. Timed out decision shall be made by bowling end umpire only after consultation with the leg umpire.
        For umpires to make decision on timed out, they shall maintain strict time record once wicket has fallen.
    2. BOWLING RULES

      1. Adjustment of Overs

        If the start of the match is delayed due to delay caused by a team, the number of overs shall be reduced based on one over for every 5 minutes or part thereof of time lost.
      2. NO-BALL

        1. Runs scored off no balls shall be added to the one bonus run, which is automatic with such deliveries.
        2. The umpire(s) will warn the fielding team the first time if any fielders (including the wicket-keeper) talk after the bowler has started his run-up. The umpire will then call a No-Ball each subsequent occasion, if any fielders (including the wicket-keeper) talk after the bowler has started his run-up. The batsman can walk away from his stance if fielders are talking after the ball is in play.
        3. The umpire will call a no-ball if the wicket-keeper gathers the ball before the ball has crossed the stumps without making any contact with the bat or body of the batsman.
        4. Declared Out for a No-ball: When a No-Ball is bowled, a batsman can be declared out for any of the following – run-out, handled the ball, obstructing the field.
        5. Front Foot No-ball: If at the point of landing, no part of the bowler’s front foot (grounded or raised) is behind the popping crease the umpire will call and signal a No-Ball.
        6. Back Foot No-ball: If bowler’s back foot touches the return crease during the delivery stride, then the umpire will signal a No-Ball. The return crease (side crease perpendicular to popping crease) shall be marked from the corner stump at the bowling end to a standard size bat + handle and shall be unlimited in length. Note that if the heel is raised above (but not touching) the line, then it is not a no-ball.
        7. High Full Pitched Balls: Any delivery which passes or would have passed on the full above waist height of the striker standing upright at the crease is to be deemed unfair. The umpire shall call and signal No-Ball for each such delivery
          1. Action is to be taken by the umpire feels that the ball was fast enough to be deemed dangerous. The first occurrence will result in a warning and a subsequent instance will result in the suspension of bowling privileges for the bowler.
          2. If the striker has moved from his normal guard position, then the umpire will call no-ball only if he feels that the ball would have passed on the full above waist height of the striker if he were standing upright at the crease.
        8. Full Pitched Delivery Hitting the Stumps: If the delivery hits the stumps without making any contact with the bat or the batsman, the ball will be deemed valid and the batsman will be declared out bowled. If the delivery makes contact with the bat or the body of the batsman before hitting the stumps, it will be subject to the conditions associated with height related no-balls.
        9. Short Pitch Bowling: A fast short-pitched ball is defined as a ball, which passes, or would have passed, above the shoulder and below the head of the batsman standing upright at the crease, irrespective of whether the batsman makes contact with the ball in any way. A bowler shall be limited to one (1) such fast short-pitched delivery per over.
          1. In the event of a bowler bowling more than one (1) fast short-pitched delivery in an over, the umpire at the bowler's end shall call and signal "no ball" on each subsequent occasion.
        10. In the event of calling of no-balls for short pitch bowling, umpires can consult each other and overturn any decision as a result of the consultation.
        11. A ball that is bowled underarm and will be called a No-Ball. In this case, the bowler will also not be allowed to bowl in the match and will also incur penalties in the form of a fine and/or suspended for future matches.
        12. No-ball when bowler breaking wicket while delivering ball: Either umpire shall call and signal No ball if, other than to run out the non-striker, the bowler breaks the wicket at any time after the ball comes into play and before he completes the stride after the delivery stride.
      3. NO BALL – ILLEGAL FIELDER MOVEMENT

        1. Definition of illegal movement by the fielders: While the bowler is running in to bowl
          1. Wicket Keeper cannot move at all
          2. Rest of the fielders can only move forward or backward but not sideways while also adhering to inner circle fielder rules
        2. If, in the opinion of either umpire, the fielders and/or wicket keeper are not following the above law, the striker’s end umpire shall then
          1. caution the fielder
          2. inform and caution the captain of the fielding side of the reason for this action.
        3. If, after first caution, either umpire considers that, in that innings, a further illegal fielding movement incident occurs from the fielding side, the umpire shall call and signal No ball.
        4. If either umpire considers that, in that innings, a further illegal fielding movement incident occurs from the fielding side, striker’s end umpire shall signal No ball. And the umpires together shall report the occurrence as soon as possible after the match to the dispute resolution committee, who shall then take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain concerned.
        5. If the same team is again reported for such fielding movement violations in further matches, then the umpires shall repeat the above laws - basically warning the fielding side captain the first time, signaling No-ball the second time it happens in that same match, who shall then take such an action that includes suspending the captain from playing in further matches and/or levy penalties including fines.
      4. NO BALL – ARM ACTION

        1. Throwing the ball: If the bowler throws the ball towards the striker’s end before entering his delivery stride, either umpire shall call and signal No ball.
        2. Definition of fair delivery - the arm: A ball is fairly delivered in respect of the arm if, once the bowler’s arm has reached the level of the shoulder in the delivery swing, the elbow joint is not straightened partially or completely from that point until the ball has left the hand. However, since it’s not completely possible to validate the 15 degrees in DPL, umpires will be looking for the obvious straightening of the bowler’s arm/elbow joint when the ball is delivered.
        3. Bowling with BENT ELBOW is not considered throwing or chucking. Bowling with a flex in wrist, shoulder or rotation of wrist is NOT considered throwing or chucking. Throwing OR chucking is considered only when elbow is significantly flexed such that it is obvious to umpire’s naked eyes when bowl is delivered.
        4. No ball for illegal arm action (chucking) is an on-field decision and the umpire’s interpretation and decision is final. If the team has objection to umpire’s interpretation, they shall consult the SURFRS committee after the game.
        5. Although it is the primary responsibility of the striker’s end umpire to assess the fairness of a delivery in this respect, there is nothing in this Law to debar the striker’s end umpire from calling and signaling No ball if he considers that the ball has been thrown.
        6. If, in the opinion of either umpire, the ball has been thrown, the striker’s end umpire shall then
          1. caution the bowler. This caution shall apply throughout the innings.
          2. inform the captain of the fielding side of the reason for this action.
          3. inform the batsmen at the wicket of what has occurred.
        7. If, after first caution, either umpire considers that, in that innings, a further delivery by the same bowler is thrown, the umpire shall call and signal No ball the procedure set out in

          (a) above law shall be repeated, indicating to the bowler that this is a final warning.
        8. This warning shall also apply throughout the innings.

        9. If either umpire considers that, in that innings, a further delivery by the same bowler is thrown, he shall call and signal No ball and when the ball is dead inform the other umpire of the reason for the call.

          The striker’s end umpire shall then,
          1. direct the captain of the fielding side to suspend the bowler forthwith. The over shall, if applicable, be completed by another bowler, who shall neither have bowled the previous over or part thereof nor be allowed to bowl any part of the next over.
          2. The bowler thus suspended shall not bowl again in that innings.
          3. inform the batsmen at the wicket and, as soon as practicable, the captain of the batting side of the occurrence.
        10. The fielding team cannot team cannot use justification along the lines that this bowler has been bowling like this before and was not called for chucking. Any prolonged arguments will be deemed to be hostile behavior and is liable for sanction.
        11. The umpires together shall report the occurrence as soon as possible after the match to the dispute resolution committee, who shall then take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain and the bowler concerned.
        12. If the same bowler is again reported for such bowling action in further matches, then the umpires shall repeat the above laws - basically warning the bowler the first time, signaling No-ball the second time it happens in that same match, suspending the bowler from that match and notifying the dispute resolution committee, who shall then take such an action that includes suspending the bowler from bowling in further matches.
      5. WIDE BALL

        1. If the bowler bowls a ball sufficiently wide on either side of the wicket to make it impossible for the striker, standing in his normal guard position, to play a normal cricket stroke, the umpire at the bowler's end shall call and signal "wide ball”.
        2. In cases where the batsman moves before the ball is delivered - the umpire will NOT signal a wide ball in either of the following conditions –
          1. The batsman has moved laterally towards the off side before the ball is delivered, In this case, the off-side marker will be deemed to have also moved. The umpire will have to extrapolate the likely distance to make the wide calls. Please note that this is for substantial movement, not just taking an off-stump guard.
          2. The batsman moves away towards the leg side, but cannot reach the ball but the ball is still within the wide marker on the off-side.
        3. The leg side wide is defined by the ball passing the batsman outside the leg stump without making any contact with the bat or body of the batsman. However, a wide will NOT be called in either of the following conditions –
          1. If the ball passes between the batsman and the stumps, then a wide will NOT be called.
          2. If the ball passes through the legs of the batsman.
          3. If the ball passes over any part of stumps but behind the batsman.
        4. If the bowler bowls a first short-pitched ball which passes, or would have passed, above the head of the batsman standing upright at the crease, the leg umpire shall call and signal "wide ball". It also includes warning. Any subsequent ball within over shall be counted as NO-BALL.
        5. Any byes that result from a wide ball are to be scored as wides.
        6. Runs scored off wide balls shall be added to the one bonus run, which is automatic with such deliveries.
        7. Pitching outside the mat: A ball that is pitched outside the width of the matand goes away from the stumps but bounces only once before crossing the stump line will be called a Wide ball. However the following are the exceptions when a ball cannot be called a wide:
          1. If the ball, after pitching outside the width of the mat comes in to hit the wickets, the ball will be considered a Dead Ball.
          2. If the ball, after pitching outside the width of the mat bounces more than once before crossing the stump line, will be considered a Dead Ball.
        8. The orientation of batting namely the leg (on) and off side of the batsman is determined by the stance of the batsman before the delivery stride of the bowler begins and wides are determined accordingly.
        9. Switch Hits: A switch hit is defined as the case wherein the batsman changes his grip and orientation after the ball comes into play.
          1. The moment the batsman attempts a switch hit, both sides of the wicket will be treated as the off-side for the purposes of calling a wide.
          2. This is not applicable to a reverse hit/sweep wherein the batsman has not changed his grip to match the opposite orientation.
      6. DEAD BALL

        1. A ball that bounces more than once before crossing the batsman's stump line will be called a dead ball.
        2. On a half mat, a ball that is pitched in front of the mat area near the main umpire (outside of the mat area towards non-striker) will be called a dead ball.
        3. When the ball is finally settled in the hands of the wicket-keeper or the bowler.
        4. A boundary is scored.
        5. A batsman is dismissed.
        6. If the batsman moved out of stance and makes no attempt to play the delivered ball and the umpire was satisfied and determined that the batsman was not ready.
        7. Whether played or not, the ball becomes trapped between the legs of a batsman or between items of his clothing or equipment.
        8. Whether played or not it lodges in the clothing or equipment of a batsman or the clothing of an umpire.
        9. Lost ball is called.
        10. The umpire calls over or Time.
        11. It is clear to the umpire at the striker’s end that the fielding side and both batsmen at the wicket have ceased to regard it as in play.
        12. One or both bails fall from the striker’s wicket before the striker has had the opportunity of playing the ball.
        13. The bowler drops the ball accidentally before delivery.
        14. Bowler attempts to run out non-striker before delivery that does not result in mankad-out of the non-striker.
        15. If umpires need to consult with each other or the players.
        16. If a player or umpire is injured.
    3. FIELDING RULES

      1. GENERAL FIELDING RULES

        1. Wicket-Keeper is the only fielder allowed to wear gloves and (external) leg guards, in addition to any protective gear worn under their clothing. All other fielders cannot use gloves or any part of their clothing to field the ball. If they willfully use any part of their clothing to field the ball, they will be penalized 5 penalty runs to the opposition.
        2. If the batsman intentionally obstructs fielder while fielding the ball, taking a catch or trying to run out the batsman then the umpire will signal the batsman as out. The umpires will decide whether the obstructing the field was intentional or unintentional.
        3. All fielders should be inside the boundary when the bowler starts their run-up.
        4. All fielders in the ground will not make any kind of noise or inappropriate gesture after bowler starts their run-up.
        5. Any significant movement by any fielder after the ball comes into play, and before the ball reaches the striker, is unfair and either umpire shall call and signal Dead ball. Fielders in the outfield can move in a straight line towards the wicket - lateral movement is deemed unfair and would result in a dead ball. Recent ICC rule changes, however allow a close-in fielder behind the wicket to move in response to a striker’s actions with regards to the shot he is about to or shaping to play.
        6. If a fielder throws any part of his clothing (such as a cap) at the ball to stop/divert the ball, it would be deemed as unfair play and five penalty runs would be awarded in addition to runs earned by the batsman. This is to be reported to CDDA as an act of unfair play, which in turn could lead to additional sanctions from CDDA on the player and the team.
      2. FIELDERS POSITIONING

        1. A maximum of 5 players are allowed on batsman’s leg side of the pitch, while there is no limit on batsman’s offside.
        2. During Power Play Overs:
          1. If fielding team has 10 or 11 players on the field, only 3 fielders can stay outside the 30-yard circle.
          2. If fielding team has 8 or 9 players on the field, then only 2 fielders can stay outside the inner circle.
        3. After the power play overs, only 4 fielders can stay outside the inner circle.
        4. Umpiresmissing calling out no-balls on Field Position violations and restrictions
          1. This is regarding the restrictions in place with regards to positioning of fielders during the game either during or outside power-plays. These includes restriction on the maximum number of fielders allowed outside the inner circle, on the leg side or behind the wicket behind the stumps on the leg-side.
          2. The fielders must meet these requirements before the ball is in play. In other words, a fielder cannot walk into position to meet these requirements after the bowler has started his run-up.
          3. The responsibility for identifying and calling a no-ball on such violations is with the leg umpire. The following will apply in cases where this has been overlooked by the umpires:
            1. The leg umpire is expected to call a no-ball when a bowler starts his run-up if the above field restrictions are not met. If the leg umpire failed to make the call, the straight umpire can also make this call.
            2. If the fielding formation violation was missed and the ball was completed, then –
              1. That ball can be declared a no-ball post-facto until the bowler gets into his delivery stride for the next ball. Batting team can draw umpires’ attention toward violation to this rule by fielding team.
              2. The rules regarding no-ball dismissals automatically apply for the ball that was deemed a no-ball post-facto. Additionally, run-outs that involved any of the fielders who contributed to the illegal formation will also be reversed. This also means run-outs effected by other fielders, batsman obstructing the fielder and hitting the ball twice will still be deemed out.
            3. The playing teams can report umpires who miss the call a second time in the same game. This could lead to warnings to the umpires.
      3. RUN-OUTS & STUMPINGS

        1. Mankading out: The non-striker can be judged run out by the umpire if the bowler intentionally hits the non-striker’s wickets before releasing the ball in order to attempt to run out the non-striker as long as he has not completed his delivery swing. Note the following restrictions and implications of the action –
          1. One team warning before mankading results in a run-out
          2. The umpire will only issue a warning to the team on the first occurrence of either

            a. explicitly noticing a batsman stepping out of the crease before the ball is delivered or
            b. a successful mankading incident executed by the fielding team.
          3. The warning is only to be issued by the umpire and it is applicable to the entire team. The run-out law comes into effect from that point onwards for that inning.
          4. Please note that the fielding team must not pressurize the umpire to issue a warning in the absence of a successful mankading effort.
          5. The umpire will only issue a warning if he believes that the non-striker has stepped out of the crease before the delivery swing.
          6. Bowlers attempting run-outs after running through without delivering the ball: If both feet of the bowler have crossed the popping crease without delivering the ball, the delivery is deemed dead immediately. The non-striker cannot be run-out in such situations.
          7. Bowlers stopping in mid-delivery action without delivering the ball: A bowler who fails to deliver the ball for a third time after entering into his bowling stride is subject to a warning. From that point onwards the said bowler can no longer run-out [mankad] a non-striker who has stepped out of the crease at the time of delivery.
          8. Whether the attempt is successful or not, the ball shall not count as one of the over. If the bowler fails in an attempt to run out the non-striker, the umpire shall call and signal Dead ball.
        2. A batsman can be adjudged run-out on a No Ball or a Wide ball in addition to legal deliveries.
        3. A batsman can be adjudged stumped on a Wide ball in additional to legal deliveries.
        4. If the ball hits a batsman’s body, but not the bat, he can only be adjudged out stumped by the wicket-keeper. The batsman cannot be adjudged out via run out in such a case.
        5. It will be deemed a run out when the batsman has not reached the crease and ball hits the stumps and bails fall off even if the stumps had moved from their original position (but bails were still on the stumps).
        6. Bails disturbed prior to run-out/stumping when struck by the ball or fielding team player:
          1. One bail dislodged: If one bail is dislodged, it shall be sufficient for the purpose of putting the wicket down to remove the remaining bail, or to strike or lift the stumps out of the ground.
          2. Both bails dislodged: Wicketkeeper or the fielder is required to physically lift the stumps off the ground with the ball in hand.
        7. If the wicket is disturbed when a batsman wanders outside the crease when the ball is in play even though there is no attempt to take a run –
          1. If the action is effected by the wicket-keeper, this will be deemed a stumping.
          2. If the action is effected by anyone other than the wicket-keeper, this will be deemed a run-out.
      4. WICKET-KEEPING

        1. Only the wicket keeper is allowed to wear gloves of any kind.
        2. The wicket keeper is allowed to collect the ball which did not touch either the bat or body parts of the batsman only after passing the wickets. If the ball has touched the bat or the body of the batsman then wicket keeper can collect the ball anytime.
        3. The fielding team can change the wicket keeper at any time during the innings. The fielding team captain is expected to let the umpire know of the change.
        4. The wicket keeper is NOT obligated to forewarn the batsman or umpire if moving in closer to the stumps if he moves before the bowler takes the run-up. Any movement by the wicketkeeper towards the wicket after the bowler starts his run-up is considered significant and shall be called dead ball by either umpire.
        5. If the wicket-keeper throws any part of his clothing (such as a cap or gloves) at the ball in order to stop/divert, it would be deemed as unfair play and five penalty runs would be awarded in addition to runs earned by the batsman. This is to be reported to CDDA as an act of unfair play, which in turn could lead to additional sanctions from CDDA on the player and the team.
      5. BOUNDARY

        1. If the ball rolls over the boundary line (marker) then it is considered as “Four”.
        2. If the ball is inside the boundary line and any part of the fielder’s body is touching/outside the boundary line and at the same time if the fielder touches the ball, it is considered as “Four”.
        3. If the ball directly bounces over the boundary line (marker) it is considered as “Six”.
        4. If the ball directly touches the boundary line (marker) it is considered as “Six”.
        5. If the fielder catches the ball and touching or over the boundary line (marker) it is considered as “Six”.
        6. If the ball rolls over and touches any non-moving object which is inside the boundary line it is considered as “Four”. (Example: Water bottle, Helmet etc. but NOT the cones placed on inner circle and boundary)
      6. ABSENT OR LEAVING THE FIELD/SUBSTITUTE FIELDERS

        1. For players absent from the playing field before the start of the match, please refer to the section on “Assembling for the Game” to deal with situations wherein players come in late for a match.
        2. The consent of the umpire at the bowler's end must be obtained for a player to leave the field or return to the field during a session of play. A player who leaves the field and is absent from the field for longer than 15 minutes shall not be permitted to bowl after his return until he has been on the field for at least that length of playing time for which he was absent.
        3. Substitute Fielder: The consent of the opposing captain must be obtained for the use of a substitute fielder if any player is prevented from fielding for any reason other than illness or injury suffered during the match.
        4. A fielder can leave the field anytime and be substituted by another fielder. The original fielder can only return to the field at the end of the over.
        5. The umpires have the discretion to reject the request for a substitute
          1. If this privilege is being abused.
          2. If the substitution is for someone who is unable to field due to pre-existing conditions.
        6. A substitute is not allowed to bat, bowl or keep wickets. In other words, can only be a fielder. Any dismissals effected by the substitute will be recorded in the detail scorecard as “Sub”.
        7. DPL members who have (a) registered on DPL website and (b) are registered in The Scoring System (CricHQ or similar)or any other scoring system for the fielding team can be allowed as the Substitute fielders.
  2. THE GAME/MATCH

    1. DELAY OF GAME

      For all DPL games, teams are required to complete each over within 5 minutes. If a team fails to complete its scheduled overs in given time (not including break during innings) will be penalized as per the DPL Rules.
    2. POWER PLAY

      1. There will be a total of 6 overs of power play per innings. And all 6 power play overs will be the first 6 overs of the innings.
      2. Fielders positioning during Powerplay:
        1. If fielding team has 8 players on the field, then 0 fielders can stay outside the inner circle.
        2. If fielding team has 9 players on the field, then only 1 fielder can stay outside the inner circle.
        3. If fielding team has 10 players on the field, then only 2 fielders can stay outside the inner circle.
        4. If fielding team has 11 players on the field, then only 3 fielders can stay outside the inner circle.
      3. Either umpire can call “No-Ball” if more fielders are standing outside the inner circle during the “Power Play”.
      4. Where the number of overs for either team is reduced, the number of overs in regard to the restrictions specified above shall be in accordance with the following table. If on resumption after a delay the number of overs has been exceeded, this shall take effect immediately.
      5. Total Overs In Innings

        Number of Power Play Overs

        19 – 20

        6

        16 – 18

        5

        13 – 15

        4

        10 – 12

        3


      6. The field should adhere to the afore-mentioned power play fielding restrictions when the ball comes into play, which is when the bowler starts his run-up. Failing which the umpire will call a no-ball.
    3. BREAK BETWEEN INNINGS

      1. Breaks between innings shall not exceed 10 minutes. However, both captains may agree to make them shorter.
      2. Each drink break shall be exactly 10 minutes and may not exceed 1 per innings. Umpires must offer breaks to both teams at similar intervals in both innings. In the event a team refuses to take its break as offered by the umpire, it may not request another one before the next scheduled break.
      3. Drink intervals shall not be taken if both captains agree to forego a drinks interval, or if an innings has been reduced to fewer than qualified overs because of unfavorable weather conditions.
    4. RESULT

      1. A result can only be achieved if both teams have had the opportunity of batting for at least 10 overs, unless the team batting second has scored more runs than its opponents or has achieved its target score as hereinafter defined.
      2. Save as hereinafter provided a match shall be won by the team which has scored the most runs.
      3. Where a team batting second does not have the opportunity of batting the same number of overs as the team batting first due to time being lost after the commencement of their batting, the result shall be determined by the DPL Interrupted Match Method, hereby called as DIMM. The DIMM calculator will be available on the DPL website.
      4. DIMM:Target score for team batting second shall be determined immediately prior to the start of the innings of the team batting second using the following formula:
        1. (20 + {d x1.2}) x (1st innings run rate) x (1/20)

          • • Where d = difference in overs to be played at the commencement of the innings of the team batting second.
          • • (1st innings run rate) = (1st innings score) / (number of overs allocated to the team batting first)
          • Note: i) The run rate of both the first and second innings shall be calculated to two decimal places.
          • Note: ii) The run rate shall be agreed by both scorers and umpires prior to the start of innings and once agreed shall be final.
          • Note: iii) Once the run rate for the second innings has been calculated it shall remain as the run rate for that innings even though a later interruption may reduce the number of overs the team batting second can receive.
          • Note: iv) If the second innings commences with the same number of overs allocated to the team batting first the run rate shall remain as the first innings run rate even though a later interruption may reduce the number of overs the team batting second can receive.
          1. The run rate shall be multiplied by the lowest reduced number of overs which the team batting second shall be entitled to receive after making allowance for time lost after the commencement of the match. The resulting figure shall be the “target score”
          2. If the score of team batting second surpasses the “target score” at any time prior to the conclusion of its innings then the match shall be won by the team batting second but if bowled out earlier the match shall be won by the team batting first.
          3. A match shall be tied if the scores are equal at the end of the match. In a match interrupted after the commencement, where the revised target score involves a fraction of a run, then the final scores cannot be equal and the result cannot be a tie.
    5. TIED GAMES

      1. During the regular league phase, for tied games, there will be no super over and both teams will share the points.
      2. During the playoff phase, for tied games, super over will be played to decide the result.
    6. SUPER OVER

      Please note that some of the DPL super over rules differ from the ICC T20 super over format. The following are the guidelines to be used for super-overs in DPL:
      1. Divisional matches that end in a tie at the end of regulation will remain as TIED games and both teams will each share a point.
      2. ONLY the Playoff games that end in a tie at the end of regulation will require a super-over to be played.
      3. The super over starts approximately five minutes after the regular time of the match is completed.
      4. Three batsmen and one bowler for each team need to decide before start of Super over.
      5. Each team must play with same playing 11 that played in the tied game.
      6. Team batting second in regular match bats first in super over.
      7. Loss of two wickets ends super over innings for a team.
      8. Each team will get to bat 1 over (6 Balls).
      9. The team that scores the most number of runs will be declared as winner.
      10. If the game remains tied at the end of the super over, the teams will play a second super over match. This will continue until one team wins the match in the super over.

APPENDIX B1–DIMM / 2nd Innings Target Score Calculator

EXAMPLE OF REDUCED OVER RATE CALCULATION

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

1st innings
Runs
Scored

Overs allotted at start of match

Run Rate =A/B
(to 2 decimal places)

Overs allocated to side
batting second at commencement of second innings

d = (B – D)
Difference in overs

d x 1.2

Run rate for team batting second
= (100 + F)
X C x 1/100

101

20

5.05

13

8

8.4

5.47

Target Score = Overs allocated to side batting second x G
(Example above Target score = 13 x 5.47 = 71.11 = 72 to win)
Overs reduced again after start of second innings:
New Target score = Revised number overs allocated to side batting second x G
 (Example further reduction after start of 2nd innings of 1 overs New Target score = 12 x 6.26 = 65.64 = 66 to win)



APPENDIX B2–Sample NRR Calculation

Game Results:

Net Run Rate Calculations:

Match 1
Team A: 96 runs/20 overs
Team B: 65 runs/20 overs

Team A:
For 96+78 = 174 in 38.3 overs = 4.52
Against 65+78 = 143 in 40 overs = 3.575
Net RR 4.52-3.575 = 0.945

Match 2
Team B: 80 runs/19.4 overs (20 overs considered for run rate)
Team C: 81 runs/20 overs

For Team B:
For 65+80 = 145 in 40 overs = 3.625
Against 81+96 = 177 in 40 overs = 4.425
Net RR 3.625-4.425 = -0.8

Match 3
Team C: 78 runs/20 overs
Team A: 78 runs/18.3 overs

For Team C:
For 78+81 = 159 in 40 overs = 3.975
Against 80+78 = 158 in 38.3 overs = 4.1
Net RR 3.975-4.1 = -0.125



APPENDIX – D: Additional Disciplinary Offences

 

Other Reported Disciplinary Offences

1

Abuse of cricket equipment, clothing, ground equipment or fixtures and fittings.

The knocking of stumps, or the throwing or kicking of a bat, ball, or any equipment on the field of play or within the curtilage of the premises or ground.

2

Abusive behavior

Using language and/or gesture of an obscene or a serious insulting nature to another player, umpire, team official or spectator.

3

Aggressive behavior

3.1 Repeated charging or advancing towards an umpire in an aggressive manner when appealing.  The Captain may also be disciplined.

 

3.2 Throwing the ball at or near a player, umpire or official in an inappropriate and dangerous manner.

 

3.3 The bowling of fast short pitched balls that result in the bowler being disallowed from bowling further in that innings.

4

Captain failing to control his players following a request

This is a major transgression against the Spirit of Cricket.

5

Abuse of an umpire (including intimidation by word or action)

5.1 Dissent by action OR verbally.

 

5.2 Verbal OR written abuse (including language that is obscene, offensive or insulting and/or the making of an obscene gesture.

6

Intimidating and threatening behavior

6.1 Intimidating an umpire.

 

6.2 Threatening to assault another player, team official or spectator.

 

6.3 Racial / Homophobic/Sexual Abuse of any person Using language or gesture that offends, insults, humiliates, intimidates, threatens, disparages or vilifies another person on the basis of that person’s race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, color, descent, national or ethnic origin.

7

Threatening and violent behavior

7.1 Threatening an umpire.

 

7.2 Physical assault on another player, umpire, official or spectator.

 

7.3 Any act of violence on the field of play.

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